Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

La Bibbia Nel Concilio: La Redazione Della Constituzione "Del Verbum" del Vaticano II

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

La Bibbia Nel Concilio: La Redazione Della Constituzione "Del Verbum" del Vaticano II

Article excerpt

La Bibbia net Concilio: La redazione della costituzione "Dei Verbum "del Vaticano II. By Riccardo Burigana. [Istituto per le scienze religiose: Testi e ricerche di scienze religiose, nuova serie, 21.] (Bologna: Societa editrice il Mulino. 1998. Pp, 514. Lire 65,000 paperback.)

This work recounts in great detail the evolution of Vatican Council If's Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation from the ante-preparatory phase of the Council to the final vote of November 18,1965. Thanks to his thorough examination of many personal archives, the author is able to trace every stage of the discussion in the various committees and subcommittees that were responsible for this Council document. On the whole, the author's analysis confirms the usual interpretation, even while adding some surprising details.

The original schemas on "The Fonts of Revelation" and the "Deposit of Faith" were prepared, as is well known, by theologians of the Roman school under the supervision of Cardinal Alfredo Ottaviani and Father Sebastian Tromp, S.J. These schemas were challenged by a loosely knit group of non-Italian theologians, inchiding Karl Rahner, Joseph Ratzinger, Edward Schillebeeckx, Yves Congar, Marie-Dominique Chenu, and Henri de Lubac. In the course of time these theologians were supported by exegetes and ecumenists who shared the concerns of Pope John XXIII that the Council be oriented toward a return to the sources, aggiornamento, and the promotion of Christian unity. After the creation of the Secretariat for Christian Unity, the reformist party could count on the patronage of Cardinal Augustine Bea, its president. Cardinal Franz Konig and many bishops rallied to the reformist cause.

Throughout the Council the sharpest debate about revelation focused on the question of the "two sources." Granted that revelation was transmitted through Scripture and Tradition under the vigilance of the magisterium, were there any truths contained in Tradition that were not also in Scripture? The Roman school considered the affirmative answer to be a matter of faith, constantly taught, at least since the Council of Trent. The opposition, influenced by Josef Rupert Geiselmann's research on the Council of Trent, maintained that Catholics were free to hold that all revelation was in Scripture, even though some revealed truths could not be fully and clearly known without the help of tradition. …

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