Academic journal article Military Review

From the Editor

Academic journal article Military Review

From the Editor

Article excerpt

Much changed over the first five years after World War II. Japan, a former arch enemy, had become a major posting for the US military. Our European focus had shifted east from Germany to the Soviet Union. Worldwide, the 8.2 million men under arms in 1945 had drawn down to a skeletal force. And here at home, the baby boom and GI bill were fueling tremendous social change.

Amid all these changes, in 1950, Secretary of State Dean Acheson outlined the US security interests around the world. He did not mention Korea. Two weeks later, the North Koreans swarmed across the 38th parallel.

If much changed in those five years after World War II, much has remained eerily similar in Korea for almost 50 years since that war's armistice. North and South still face off across the most world's most heavily fortified border. The US military maintains a presence there to avoid another strategic miscommunication. International tensions are still high and peace talks still lead nowhere.

This issue of Military Review examines the aftermath of the Korean War-its effect on nuclear policy, regional strategy, tactical doctrine, military leadership, readiness training and Army command and control. In his study about how the Army should prepare in 2000, Joseph G.D. Babb revisits Task Force Smith in 1950. Kelly C. Jordan explains how lessons from that war affect the Army today. Acknowledging that restricted terrain characterizes the "Land of the Morning Cahn," John F. Antal nevertheless proposes concentrated armor operations in the defiles. At echelons above the hilltop warriors, policy makers pondered the use of nuclear weapons in Korea, as Stanley Weintraub chronicles. Greg A. Pickell warns us that instead of preparing for the last war, we should be ready for a re-eruption of the one a half a century ago. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.