Academic journal article Anglican Theological Review

Editor's Notes

Academic journal article Anglican Theological Review

Editor's Notes

Article excerpt

Worship is deeply important to Anglicans, and for that reason the Book of Common Prayer occupies an important place in Anglican formularies. In its various revisions and adaptations, it has helped us to define ourselves, our beliefs and practices, within the larger Christian community. And, of course, in its English language version it, along with the King James translation of the Bible, has made a significant contribution to the literary heritage of English speakers and writers. Now that Anglicanism has expanded well outside of its original home in England, the Book of Common Prayer has frequently been adapted to other cultures and languages, even while retaining something of its original structure.

But for Anglicans everywhere the radical changes which are taking place in theology, culture, and patterns of worship are requiring us to ask what is the future of the Book of Common Prayer. This is the theme of the conference held at the Church Divinity School of the Pacific in January of this past year. It is a privilege for the ATR to have been asked to publish the papers from the conference, not only because of the importance of the conference itself, but also because it was held in honor of one of the major liturgists in the Anglican Communion, Louis Weil. Over 300 people attended, including the Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church, Frank Griswold, whose sermon, preached at the principal Eucharist, is published here. We are pleased to make his sermon and the various papers available not only to the participants but also to the rest of the Anglican Communion. Both Bishop Griswold's sermon and the papers make it clear that the Book of Common Prayer has a future as long as Anglicans continue to worship and pray, although it may take a different shape from what we have known in the past. …

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