Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Chronicle of the Third Crusade. A Translation of the Itinerarium Peregrinorum et Gesta Regis Ricardi

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Chronicle of the Third Crusade. A Translation of the Itinerarium Peregrinorum et Gesta Regis Ricardi

Article excerpt

Chronicle of the Third Crusade. A Translation of the Itinerarium Peregrinorum et Gesta Regis Ricardi. By Helen J. Nicolson. [Crusade Texts in Translation 3.] (Brookfield, Vermont: Ashgate Publishing. 1997. Pp. ix, 409. $72.95.)

This excellent translation of Stubbs's Rolls Series edition (1864) of the most comprehensive, near-contemporary history of the Third Crusade will be an immense boon to all students of the crusade and of the crusading movement in general. It has long been accepted that the history, though strictly speaking anonymous, was compiled c. 1220 by Richard de Templo, prior of the Augustinian priory of Holy Trinity, London. In 1962 Hans Eberhard Mayer showed that it was an amalgam of two eyewitness narratives: the first a Latin history, which Mayer called IP 1 (Itinerarium Peregrinorum 1) of events up to the death of Archbishop Baldwin of Canterbury (November 19, 1190)-a date which, curiously, is nowhere mentioned by Dr. Nicolson in her otherwise very helpful notes-and the second, IP 2, based on the Anglo-Norman Estoire de la Guerre Sainte by Ambroise. In deciding to translate Stubbs's edition she took the simplest and most sensible course since he had taken as his base manuscript an expanded text, including some matter from Howden and Diceto which was tacked on later in the thirteenth century. Here then we have the most complete version of the chronicle in readily accessible form. Dr. Nicolson has successfully achieved her aim of producing readable modern English while staying close to the original Latin. Just occasionally she has amplified in ways which could mislead. For example, the addition of the word `Europe' when it is not there in the Latin (Book I, cc. 10 and 11) might deceive those studying ideas of Europe in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. My one regret is that the opportunity to provide a full translation of IP 1, as well as of Richard de Templo's text, was not quite grasped. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.