Academic journal article The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

Legislative Minute: March 2, 1928: Virginia War Memorial Carillon

Academic journal article The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography

Legislative Minute: March 2, 1928: Virginia War Memorial Carillon

Article excerpt

On this day in Virginia legislative history, March 2, 1928, the Senate passed a bill authorizing the construction of a memorial to honor those Virginians who served in World War I. Debate over the memorial had been going on for several years, as citizens and legislators argued over the design of the monument and how to fund it.

In the 1924 session of the Virginia General Assembly, legislators approved an act creating a war memorial commission "for the purpose of erecting in the city of Richmond a memorial" to the men and women who served in the war. Extensive discussion centered around the design of the memorial, and it was eventually agreed that a carillon, or singing tower, would be constructed.

Once a decision had been reached concerning the form of the memorial, fund-raising efforts began in earnest. Wary of assuming too great a financial responsibility in the matter, members of the house and senate stipulated in the act that no appropriations would be made by the state until two conditions were met. First, private funds would be needed to purchase bells for the carillon, amounting to a sum of nearly $75,000. …

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