Academic journal article Journal of Developmental Education

Cutback on Remedial Work in Georgia: Deadline Woes

Academic journal article Journal of Developmental Education

Cutback on Remedial Work in Georgia: Deadline Woes

Article excerpt

Georgia's goal to eliminate remedial education for traditional-age freshman by 2001 may be more difficult than expected to attain. Officials are anticipating that some of the state's public universities will fall short of achieving that objective, and a few institutions are even behind schedule for a 2005 "drop-dead" deadline for meeting the mandate.

The University System of Georgia's Board of Regents approved a policy in 1995 to require every public university to reduce its number of freshman remedial students by at least 5% per year. The original goal was to no longer admit underprepared students from high school directly into the university system by the year 2001; these students would be directed to a community college or private institution prior to admission to a 4-year, state public university. The policy further required all institutions to eliminate remedial work for freshmen by 2005.

Chancellor of the University System of Georgia, Stephen R. Portch, stated he was still confident that the 2005 deadline would be met by all 20 of the state's 4-year institutions. According to Portch, "We are largely on target. There are two or three institutions where we're concerned about the pace" (p. A37). However, he also stated that efforts to phase out classes for first-year students arriving at college underprepared for college work will need to be stepped up at a few universities. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.