Academic journal article Journal of Biblical Literature

Exodus Und Salomo: Erwagungen Zur Verdeckten Salomokritik Anhand Von Ex 1-2; 5; 14 Und 32

Academic journal article Journal of Biblical Literature

Exodus Und Salomo: Erwagungen Zur Verdeckten Salomokritik Anhand Von Ex 1-2; 5; 14 Und 32

Article excerpt

Exodus and Salomo: Erwagungen zur Verdeckten Salomokritik Anhand von Ex 1-2; 5; 14 und 32, by Pekka Sarkio. Schriften der Finnischen Exegetischen Gesellschaft 71. Gottingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1998. Pp. vi + 185. N.P.

This book is a sensitive, insightful, extremely hypothetical comparison of thematic analogues between the Solomon cycle (1 Kgs 1-11) and the Exodus narrative (Exod 1-2, 5, 14, and 32). The author is a former student (now colleague) of Timo Veijola at the University of Helsinki, and the present study builds on his earlier dissertational comparisons of alleged intertextual parallels between the Solomon and Joseph narratives (Sarkio, Die Weisheit and Macht Salomos in der Israelitischen Historiographie: Eine traditions- and redaktionskritische Untersuchung fiber Icon 3-5 and 9-11 [Schriften der Finnischen Exegetischen Gesellschaft 60; Gottingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1994]).

This is not the first time someone has wondered in print about the often striking parallels between Kings and Exodus. Others have noted how negatively both Pharaoh and Rehoboam react to requests for relief from hard labor (R. Smend, F. Crusemann), how both northern Israel (Jeroboam) and Israel-in-Egypt (Moses) follow divinely chosen leaders to freedom (J. Kegler), how each of these chosen leaders goes through a training-in-residence program followed by exile (R. Albertz), and how each has to wait until the death of a king before returning to lead his enslaved people to freedom (R. B. Coote, Albertz). The twist here, though, is this book's attempt to ground such reflections in a hypothetical redactoral schema drawn out of the book of Kings itself.

Sarkio follows E. Wurthwein (1 Konige 1-16 [ATD 11/1; Gottingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1977]) and Veijola Was Konigtum in der Beurteilung der deuteronomistischen Historiographie: Eine redaktionsgeschichtliche Untersuchung [Helsinki, 1998]) to hypothesize an earlier anti-Solomonic stratum in Kings (DtrH) to which a later redactor offers a significant number of changes, modifications, and pro-Solomonic alterations (DtrN). Still, according to this hypothesis, quite a bit of DtrH's negative portrayal remains visible, bleeding through "between the lines of DtrN" (p. 9) to leave a text pockmarked by "contradictions."

For example, where 1 Kgs 4:1-19; 5:2, 6-8 describes how Solomon's new provinces are taxed to feed the royal appetite (DtrH), DtrN, according to SarkiS, adds a happyfaith note about how their lives are nonetheless blessed (4:20). …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.