Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

L'Eglise et la Mission Au VI Siecle. la Mission d'Augustin De Cantorbery et Les Eglises De Gaule Sous L'impulsion De Gregoire le Grand

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

L'Eglise et la Mission Au VI Siecle. la Mission d'Augustin De Cantorbery et Les Eglises De Gaule Sous L'impulsion De Gregoire le Grand

Article excerpt

L'Eglise et la Mission au VI Siecle. La Mission d Augustin de Cantorbery et les Eglises de Gaule sous l'impulsion de Gregoire le Grand. Actes du Colloque d'Arles de 1998. Presente par Christophe de Dreuille. (Paris: Les Editions du Cerf. 2000. Pp. xii, 424. 1831:)

The Churches of Gaul and England have been very closely linked from the beginning. When Gregory the Great sent Augustine, the monk of his Roman community, in 596 to convert the heathen English to Christianity, he looked to Gallic bishops, kings, and clergy to help them in their arduous task. He intended this co-operation to endure long after the conversion of the English, and he wanted the relationship of assistance to be a two-way business. The English mission took shape in his mind in the context of a broad vision in which the English and the Frankish churches were to be in a mutual partnership of Christian renewal. On the Gallic side, Aries was to be at the center of this relationship with Canterbury, Augustine's see, naturally, on the English side. The bishop of Arles was papal vicar in Gaul, the fulcrum of Gregory's intentions for the reform of the Gallic Church, and-even though it is not very likely that he was the bishop who consecrated Augustine-Arles and Canterbury were the foci of the intended reciprocal link between the two churches.

The present volume presents the proceedings of a conference held to celebrate the 1400th anniversary of this relationship. It gives the text of a short address by the present archbishop of Arles, a'presentation' of the celebration by Mgr Christophe de Dreuille, its organizer, a short homily by the late Cardinal Hume, and a letter from Pope John Paul II. It also contains papers of a more than common degree of variety. Most of them (here by-passed) seem to have nothing but edification as their aim, and contribute nothing to the well-known facts of the history. There is also a group of excellent, scholarly surveys of the sixthand seventh-century Christianity in Aries, including one on the Christian antiquities of Aries itself, by their distinguished former curator, M. …

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