Academic journal article Anglican Theological Review

The New Westminster Dictionary of Liturgy and Worship

Academic journal article Anglican Theological Review

The New Westminster Dictionary of Liturgy and Worship

Article excerpt

The New Westminster Dictionary of Liturgy and Worship. Edited by Paul Bradshaw. Louisville, Ky.: Westminster John Knox Press, 2002. xiii + 493 pp. $44.95 (cloth).

There are few books more useful than a good dictionary. In The New Westminster Dictionary of Liturgy and Worship Paul Bradshaw has provided students and teachers of liturgy and worship with an excellent dictionary that is an admirable successor to J. G. Daviess two editions of the Dictionary of Liturgy and Worship (published by SCM Press and Westminster Press in 1972 and 1986). Bradshaw s edition, however, goes beyond a mere revision of Daviess dictionary.

First, Bradshaw has restructured the dictionary along several lines. Although the majority of the headings used in the earlier volumes have remained, a few have been deleted or renamed using terms more familiar to the present generation of students and scholars. One of the more helpful renamed entries is "Daily Prayer" rather than "Canonical Hours," a change that reflects both current usage and a more ecumenically friendly approach to the topic. Bradshaw has also reorganized several previous entries into more usable and interesting forms. For example, he has introduced two new entries on "Eucharist" and "Word, Services of the" to replace a more general entiy on "Liturgies."

Second, all entries from the previous editions have been rewritten, in some cases by the same authors but more usually by new authors. Only twelve authors, including Bradshaw, who wrote for the previous editions have been commissioned to write for the successor volume. The remaining 117 authors represent a broad range of religious traditions, parts of the world, and scholarly pursuits. The number of women included among the contributors has also increased from nine to nineteen.

Third, the number of entries has grown from 478 to 538. This growth comes in at least two ways. There are now numerous cross-references to Eastern liturgical terms absent from Daviess editions, making this edition far more helpful to students and teachers unfamiliar with Eastern liturgical traditions and vocabulary. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.