Academic journal article Hispanic Review

Re-Leer Hoy a Gabriela Mistral. Mujer, Historia Y Sociedad En America Latina (Simposio De Ottawa)

Academic journal article Hispanic Review

Re-Leer Hoy a Gabriela Mistral. Mujer, Historia Y Sociedad En America Latina (Simposio De Ottawa)

Article excerpt

Re-leer hoy a Gabriela Mistral. Mujer, historia y sociedad en America Latina (Simposio de Ottawa). Ed. Gaston Lillo, J. Guillermo Renart, with the collaboration of Nain N6mez. Ottawa: U of Ottawa, 1997. 188 pages.

It is for some time now that Gabriela Mistral has been due a reevaluation. Not least because the sterotypical view of her as a woman pining for children she never had and lamenting the fact in soppy lullabies has, even nowadays, some currency in a number of text books and some institutions of higher learning. Based on a conference held at the University of Ottawa in Novemher 1995, these proceedings offer a sharp corrective to that image. Jean Franco's, "Lots y no lots: la cultura popular en la obra de Gabriela Mistral" (27-42), is a thoughtful piece about the ways in which Mistral is able to incorporate into her poetry the disturbing undertones of oral folklore, which then occupy the site of the unspeakable in her work. Ana Pizarro, "Mistral, ?que modernidad?" (43-52), treats Mistral's resistance to modernity and the avant-garde; this essay is helpful since it refers to a number of previously unpublished letters from Duble Urrutia's archive. Grinor Rojo, "Gabriela Mistral en la historia de la mujer latinoamericana" (53-82), sees Mistral as divided between manhood and womanhood, between the middle and lower classes, and between the European and Indian races. Nain N6mez, "Gabriela Mistral y la poesia femenina de comienzos de siglo en Chile" (83-95), reads Mistral's work in the context of that by Storni, Ibarbourou and Agustini as well as other lesser-known writers, although it must be said that, despite the interesting information on the backdrop, Mistral's image becomes a little blurred in the process. Jaime Concha, "Tejer y trenzar, aspectos del trabajo en la Mistral" (97-118), shows how Mistral's poetry reweaves the threads of life which are dismantled by death, and is an authoritative close reading of Mistral's verse by one of her best critics. Jorge Etcheverry's "El friso de 'America'" (119-26) is mainly on the way America's flora and fauna are portrayed in Mistral's verse. …

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