Academic journal article African Studies Review

Transnationalism and New African Immigration to South Africa

Academic journal article African Studies Review

Transnationalism and New African Immigration to South Africa

Article excerpt

Jonathan Crush and David A. McDonald, eds. Transnationalism and New African Immigration to South Africa. Kingston, Ontario: Southern African Migration Project (SAMP) and the Canadian Association of African Studies (CAAS), 2002. iv + 188 pp. Bibliography. Index. No price reported. Paper.

The demise of apartheid has created new opportunities for migration to South Africa. The purpose of this collection of essays, drawn from research sponsored by the Southern African Migration Project (SAMP) and funded by the Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), is to examine various aspects of the new migration to South Africa. These aspects are considered in seven fascinating case studies originally published in 2000 as a special issue of the Canadian Journal of African Studies.

The editors identify a number of emergent trends in the introductory essay. They find that foreign migrants are undeterred by staggeringly high unemployment rates in South Africa, and that women from neighboring countries are a growing proportion of the migrant population. Increasingly unauthorized migration is coming from outside neighboring countries, and South Africa is a new destination for refugees fleeing political and cultural persecution. Nonetheless, except for the circumstances that made them leave, most migrants prefer the life they left behind in their home countries.

In specific case studies, the authors find that the civil war in Mozambique has altered the nature of migration to South Africa, resulting in changes in the structure of households and the meaning of marriage in Mozambique. The new movement of women migrants from Lesotho to farms in South Africa represents the beginning of a gendered reconfiguration of the formal contract migrant labor system. In the Marconi Beam settlement in Cape Town, South African citizens support the right of foreigners to housing and services, whereas in the informal settlement of Mezamoyethu, Cape Town, poverty and unemployment have fueled xenophobia and violence.

A further concern in this work is the applicability of the conceptual framework of transnationalism to migration to South Africa. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.