Academic journal article Generations

Our Guest Editor

Academic journal article Generations

Our Guest Editor

Article excerpt

For older people, modern medications have brought remarkable progress in treatment of chronic diseases and conditions, reduction of disability, and extension of the lifespan. But older people are also among the most vulnerable to medication-related problems, which take their toll in reduced function, preventable illness and disability, and even death. When these health concerns are combined with problems related to access to and payment for prescription drugs, the question of what consumers and caregivers as well as healthcare and service professionals can do to ensure that medications for older people are appropriate, safe, and effective is one of the critical issues in gerontology today.

This issue's guest editor, Janice L. Feinberg, who holds doctorates in pharmacy and law, is ideally suited to address such a complex topic. For the past ten years she has served as executive director of the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists (Ascp) Research and Education Foundation in Arlington, Va.

Feinberg chose pharmacy as a career assuming that she would follow in her father's footsteps. "But when I entered pharmacy school in 1969, I soon realized that I was not being trained to be the same kind of pharmacist my father was:

Feinberg was entering the field at a time of rapid change. "The fourth year of pharmacy school was devoted to clinical rotations," she said, and pharmacists were becoming part of decentralized clinical pharmacy services, consuiting with physicians and nurses, and taking an increasingly active role in patient care.

After a ten-year stint at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, where she was assistant director of pharmacy, Feinberg entered Loyola Law School. …

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