Academic journal article Journal of Marriage and Family

Understanding Elder Abuse in Minority Populations

Academic journal article Journal of Marriage and Family

Understanding Elder Abuse in Minority Populations

Article excerpt

Understanding Elder Abuse in Minority Populations. Toshio Tatara (Ed.). Philadelphia: Brunner/Mazel. 1998. 220 pp. ISBN 0-87630-919-- 8. $64.95 cloth, $29.95 paper.

For many years, the victims of elder abuse remained hidden from view as studies of spouse and child abuse dominated the research landscape on family violence. Although elder abuse emerged as part of the mainstream research on family violence during the 1980s, the experience of elders of color continued to remain in the background. The purpose of this edited volume is to bring to the foreground the experiences of abused elderly persons of color, as told from the perspective of practitioners and researchers of color whose cultural sensitivities may deepen our understanding of elder mistreatment in ethnic communities.

The book is organized into five major sections with an introductory chapter providing an overview of the demography of elder abuse in minority populations. The first four sections address elder abuse with respect to four ethnic populations: African American, Hispanic, Asian American, and American Indian. The fifth and last section of the book offers a cross-cultural perspective on elder abuse. One distinctive feature of this edited volume is that each of the five sections is composed of multiple chapters written from either the perspective of a researcher or practitioner. The unique insights that these different views provide in understanding elder abuse in minority populations speak to the need for closer collaborations between researchers and practitioners in studying elder abuse and for developing effective intervention strategies.

With few exceptions, each chapter provides the reader with a deeper appreciation of how cultural factors influence the definition, identification, and risk of elder abuse in minority populations and the barriers to seeking help. …

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