Academic journal article Tamara : Journal of Critical Postmodern Organization Science

Flying Home

Academic journal article Tamara : Journal of Critical Postmodern Organization Science

Flying Home

Article excerpt

I asked guitar poet Randy Granger if he would let Tamara publish part of a song he wrote, called "Flying Home." He told me it reminded him of Nike's global business practices.

What are we gonna do/

They've got our children there/

In a factory where/

The Sun will never ever shine/

They've got brittle bones/

And the brightest smiles/

Brighter than the sun/

They sing, fly, fly, fly/

Brother fly on/

Sister fly on/Children fly/

We all fly home

Words and Music by: Randy Granger Copyright 2000 granger, rj.

We know that since the Life Magazine expose of soccer ball stitching in Pakistan (Schanberg, 1996), Nike has moved away from the pre-teen child labor market. To keep the record straight, the mean age of a Nike worker is now 16 to 23, with a few who are 13 to 15 trying to pass for older. After age 23, the mostly female workforce is fired, to make way for younger and cheaper labor. The stanzas about brittle bones, and where the Sun will never ever shine, recalls what Marx (1867, Ch 10) observed:

But in its blind unrestrainable passion, its were-wolf hunger for surplus-labour, capital oversteps not only the moral, but even the merely physical maximum bounds of the working-day. It usurps the time for growth, development, and healthy maintenance of the body. …

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