Academic journal article The International Journal of African Historical Studies

Alles Unter Kontrolle: Disziplinierungsprozesse Im Kolonialen Tansania (1850-1960)

Academic journal article The International Journal of African Historical Studies

Alles Unter Kontrolle: Disziplinierungsprozesse Im Kolonialen Tansania (1850-1960)

Article excerpt

Alles unter Kontrolle: Disziplinierungsprozesse im kolonialen Tansania (1850-1960). Edited by Albert Wirz, Andreas Eckert, and Katrin Bromber. Köln: Rüdiger Koppe Verlag, 2003. Pp. iv, 261; 15 illustrations. euro29.80 paper.

Alles unter Kontrolle: Disziplinierungsprozesse im Kolonialen Tansania (1850-1960) (Everything under Control: Disciplinary Processes in Colonial Tanzania) collects essays from several German historians and puts them together under the theme of "discipline." The assortment of topics provides several interesting looks into primarily German colonialism (six of nine essays) and secondarily British (three of nine).

Following an introduction by Albert Wirz, heavily laden with theory, comes three sections that roughly group the contributions. The first section "Zeitenwechsel" ("Change of Times") contains two essays. The first by Katrin Bromber discusses Islamic education on the coast in the late nineteenth century. The second by Bromber and Jürgen Becher details the interesting life of Abdallah bin Hemedi (c.1840-1912) as he moves from the Zanzibar sultan's court to Shambaa; at the time of his death, he held the highest office an African could hold in the German colonial government.

The section "Neue Kleider" ("New Clothes") contains an interesting mixture of four chapters. Bromber again contributes an interesting piece concerning a usually neglected form of Swahili verse poetry (Swahiliverskunst) written for the German colonizers and effectively argues for its use as a historical source. The second essay comes from the pen of Michael Pesek and deals with "Islam and Politics in German East Africa." This is perhaps the best contribution to the volume for it lays out a concise history of the political importance of Islam in the German colony. Finally, Becher contributes an overview of the Protestant missions in German East Africa and a short biography of Martin Ganyisha (c. 1876/77-1938), the first African pastor of the Berliner Missionsgesellschaft (Berlin Mission Society). Becher's treatment of the Protestant missions does not reveal much new information for he covers too many mission societies in a short essay. However, the biography provides a real look into the life of a little-known Tanzanian, one whose social ascent was enabled by the colonial rule (p. …

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