Academic journal article Military Review

MEUSE-ARGONNE DIARY: A Division Commander in World War I

Academic journal article Military Review

MEUSE-ARGONNE DIARY: A Division Commander in World War I

Article excerpt

MEUSE-ARGONNE DIARY: A Division Commander in World War I, William M. Wright and Robert H. Ferrell, ed., University of Missouri Press, Columbia, 2004, 174 pages, $29.95.

World War I general officers do not have the best reputations, but this unique book might change that. It is the only known diary of a major general commanding a division in the Allied Expeditionary Force (AEF).

Major General William M. Wright was a tireless commander who cared for the welfare of his troops, enforced discipline, and had an eye for detail. His diary refutes the myth that World War I generals were out of touch with the front line.

By the time Wright assumed command of the 89th Infantry Division, he had participated in the Santiago Campaign, the suppression of the Philippine Insurrection, and the Occupation of Veracruz. Wright assumed command of the 89th in France days before the St. Mihiel offensive, so he was in command for only the last 2 months of the war.

Major General Leonard Wood, who originally commanded primarily the Missouri-Kansas Division, remained behind as the 89th deployed to France under Brigadier General Frank L. Winn. By the time Wright took command, the division had been in theater for several months but had not been in any major combat operations. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.