Academic journal article et Cetera

The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History

Academic journal article et Cetera

The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History

Article excerpt

John M. Barry. The Great Influenza: The Epic Story of the Deadliest Plague in History. New York: Viking, 2004.

In 1918 an influenza virus emerged - probably in the United States - that would spread around the world. Before that worldwide pandemic faded away in 1920, it would kill more people than any other outbreak of disease in human history. Plague in the 130Os killed a far larger portion of the population - more than one quarter of Europe - but in raw numbers influenza killed more than plague did then, more than AIDS today (the lowest estimate of the pandemic's worldwide death toll is twenty-one million, in a world with a population less than one-third of present times). But 1918 was not the Middle Ages and the story of this epidemic was not simply one of death, suffering, and terror.

In 1918 science was used, for the first time in history, to battle epidemic disease and great scientists - pioneers who defined American medicine -fought against the pestilence. …

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