Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Ungarn, das Reich der Stephanskrone, Im Zeitalter der Reformation Und Konfessionalisierung: Multiethnizitat, Land Und Konfession 1500 Bis 1700

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Ungarn, das Reich der Stephanskrone, Im Zeitalter der Reformation Und Konfessionalisierung: Multiethnizitat, Land Und Konfession 1500 Bis 1700

Article excerpt

Early Modern European

Ungarn, das Reich der Stephanskrone, im Zeitalter der Reformation and Konfessionalisierung: Multiethnizitdt, Land and Konfession 1500 bis 1700. By Marta Fata. [Katholisches Leben and Kirchenreform im Zeitalter der Glaubensspaltung, Vol. 60.] (Munster: Aschendorff Verlag. 2000. Pp. ix, 361. DM 59.00 paperback.)

The book by Marta Fata deals with the time period of the Reformation and spiritual renewal from a Hungarian point of view, with religious politics of the, rather bloody, events in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in the historic Hungary of King St. Stephen's Crown, and draws-one may add-in a fully prepared and most knowledgeable manner, an ethnic and religious profile of the period for the serious academic scholar, and/or the reader who does not read the Magyar language or know much about this country's history in east-central Europe. The question of religious renewal, the progress made by, and mainly the circumstances surrounding Luther, Calvin, and other religious reformers, bound Hungary to the German empire, because many of the Hungarian religious reformers had pursued their studies at western universities in the Netherlands or in the empire. The specific political and religious color of the age, and of geography-in historic Hungary, besides the Magyar stratum (following the directive of King St. Stephen [d. 10381: "Nam unius lingue uniusque moris regnum inbecille et fragile est"), many nationalities had been living next to each other for centuries, as in neighboring Poland-lithuania, or in Kiev-turned this region into a battleground where the sphere of the Reformation and CounterReformation included Slovak (Upper Hungary), Croatian (together with Dalmatian and Slavonic) lands, or Transylvania with the region of the Temesvar Banat (an area that belongs to Romania today), further the sub-Carpathian region (now part of Ukraine), and the Bachka and Serem lands that are part of today's little-Jugoslavia, not to leave out Burgenland, which forms the eastern region of Austria.

The author has analyzed objectively the lengthy flow of religious reformation and the Catholic counter-renewal that went on among these various national groups for several decades, keeping in mind the most particular circumstance that the territory of historic Hungary had been, from 1541 to 1697, divided into three parts because of the Ottoman-Turkish onslaught. …

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