Academic journal article Georgia Journal of Ecological Anthropology

Preface

Academic journal article Georgia Journal of Ecological Anthropology

Preface

Article excerpt

Reflecting trends in ecological anthropology as a whole, the Georgia Journal of Ecological Anthropology continues to grow and mature. I recently had the privilege of organizing a session for the American Anthropological Association meetings in Washington, DC entitled "What's New in the New Ecological Anthropology: Defining Future Approaches." This session showcased the wide array of approaches that exemplify a growing interest in understanding human ecosystems in all their diversity and complexity. While the title was admittedly propaganda (in the original sense of the word (i.e. to promote), there is in fact a revitalization taking place within ecological anthropology driven by a new generation of scholars.

In large part, the near and not-so-near future of ecological anthropology will be defined by theoretical and methodological innovations that are currently taking place. For this new ecological anthropology to succeed it will have to avoid engaging in hype and blather, but rather utilize previous inquiries in an implictly transgenerational approach, while at the same time crossing and transcending disciplinary boundaries. As Abel notes in his contribution, anthropology needs to embrace complexity, engage in, learn from and also contribute to other disciplines. The papers presented herein are in many ways representative of this "new" ecological anthropology. They demonstrate the applicability of ecological approaches across the space/time matrix and throughout the four subfields-for example, Keyes' paper in anthropological linguistics and Zarger's paper in archaeology. …

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