Academic journal article Australian Health Review

How to Write a Case Study for Australian Health Review

Academic journal article Australian Health Review

How to Write a Case Study for Australian Health Review

Article excerpt

A case study is a form of qualitative, descriptive research about a single or small number of events or cases. Conclusions are drawn in relation to the specific participants in the specific content and there is no expectation that the results of the case study can be generalised to other subjects or contexts. Case studies describe real-life situations and are most successful when they present the 'story' and the outcomes, and analyse the failures as well as the successes, and the old and new strategies and tactics. It is valuable to set the case in a theoretical context, if relevant. The readers should be given a balanced presentation of 'what happened', so that they are in a position to assess the accuracy of the authors' analysis of the 'so what?' question.

In the context of AHR a case study describes a typical policy or management issue or situation. It is a written account of the situation and the steps taken, and is best presented from the decision maker's point of view.

The case study should be no more than 2,000 words and will be accepted for publication if it presents a balanced view, is evidence-based (but does not need to provide a comprehensive review of the literature); is applicable to and will educate others; and documents actual outcomes (both successful and unsuccessful). …

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