Academic journal article et Cetera

Battling the Inner Dummy: The Craziness of Apparently Normal People

Academic journal article et Cetera

Battling the Inner Dummy: The Craziness of Apparently Normal People

Article excerpt

David L. Weiner with Gilbert M. Hefter. Battling the Inner Dummy: The Craziness of Apparently Normal People. Amherst, New York: Prometheus, 1999.

Freud believed that the "id," a name he gave to the brain's center of instinctual action, has no concept of time, awareness, or logic. In other words, it can be impervious to the persuasion of what he called the "ego," or our rational, "external conduit" (his words) that science believes has its basis in the brain's neocortex.

For popular psychology writer David Weiner "id" stands for "Inner Dummy" and in Battling the Inner Dummy he examines and describes how this part of our brain's primitive limbic system can cause otherwise "normal" people to act wacky. For example, the inner dummy led Bill Clinton to have multiple romps with Monica Lewinsky; it moved a fifteen-yearold girl who weighed eighty-two pounds to believe she's obese; and it impelled a professor to scream profanities at other drivers in snarled traffic.

To battle the inner dummy Weiner suggests employing strategies such as:

* Change your environment in some way to avoid whatever may trigger the id drives one is trying to avoid.

* Employ "ego defense" strategies, like willpower, to resist tempting limbic-based drives and/or endure their punishing emotion. …

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