Academic journal article Anglican and Episcopal History

Walking by Faith: The Diary of Angelina Grimké, 1828-1835

Academic journal article Anglican and Episcopal History

Walking by Faith: The Diary of Angelina Grimké, 1828-1835

Article excerpt

CHARLES WILBANKS, ED. Walking by Faith: The Diary of Angelina Grimké, 1828-1835. Columbia, South Carolina: University of South Carolina Press, 2003. Pp. xxvi + 245, indices. $39.95.

Angelina Grimké and her sister Sarah were two of the most controversial members of the abolitionist movement. Within a group that by definition was controversial-indeed, sought controversy-these two sisters stood out. First, of course, they were women taking on what was heretofore considered a man's role, speaking in public. That in itself provided controversy enough, especially as they frequently addressed "promiscuous" groups, i.e both men and women. Second, the sisters were from the south-in fact, the very center of the slavocracy, Charleston. South Carolina. While this gave them added credibility in the north-coming from a slaveowning family they had first-hand experience of slavery-they were, not surprisingly, considered traitors in their homeland. Their dual identity as women and southerners made them unique in the abolitionist community and ensured large audiences (not always friendly) wherever they spoke.

Charles Wilbanks has done an excellent job of editing and elucidating Angelina's diary which she kept on and off for seven years, from the ages of twenty-three to thirty. It is the editor's contention that keeping a diary was Angelina's way of coping with a period ol spiritual and emotional turmoil during which she underwent three different types of conversion. …

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