Anglican Churches in Colonial South Carolina: Their History and Architecture

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SUSAN CAMERON LINDER. Anglican Churches in Colonial South Carolina: Their History and Architecture. Charleston, South Carolina: Wyrick & Company, 2000. Pp. 137, index. $35.00.

This handsome book, which is sponsored by the Diocese of South Carolina and the proceeds from which go towards the purchase of an episcopal residence, is a finely illustrated parish-by-parish survey of Anglican life in colonial South Carolina. Using her own photographs, together with archival images and old vvatercolors, the author aims this book more at informed laity than at academics, although the latter will find many things here of interest. Linder combines architectural, social, and religious history effectively, and draws both on standard secondary works such as Frederick Dalcho's as well as original archival research to compose her parochial sketches.

South Carolina's colonial history is generally overlooked in favor of that of its more northerly neighbors, so that Lindner's work is an attractive means of redressing the imbalance. Themes build cumulatively, and occasionally redundantly, through these brief histories of individual parishes. The fortunes and misfortunes of SPC missionaries, who represented all sorts and conditions of competence, sobriety, and honesty, are told effectively, and some familiar personages such as George Whitefield and Charles Woodmason make cameo aouearances. In addition, a variety of ethnic groups-African slaves, Native Americans, French, Swiss, Germans and Welsh-and religious communitiesBaptists and Presbyterians as well as Anglicans-form a complex social tapestry, with periodic crossings of boundaries; Huguenot clergy, for example, were often reordained as Anglicans, Intergroup conflict, especially during the Yamassee War, makes clear that colonial society here was no more benign or untroubled than elsewhere. …