Academic journal article Journal of Comparative Family Studies

Book Reviews -- Aging in Black America Edited by James S. Jackson, Linda M. Chatters and Roberts Joseph Taylor

Academic journal article Journal of Comparative Family Studies

Book Reviews -- Aging in Black America Edited by James S. Jackson, Linda M. Chatters and Roberts Joseph Taylor

Article excerpt

JACKSON, James S., Linda M. CHATTERS and Roberts Joseph TAYLOR, eds., AGING IN BLACK AMERICA. Newbury, Park: Sage Publications, Inc., 1993, 338 pp., $ 21.95 softcover.

The seventeen chapters in this volume provide analyses of data collected in the National Survey of Black Americans. The survey, conducted in 1979 and 1980, included 2,107 individuals, a cross-section sample of black Americans 18 years and older who resided in individual households and were self-identified as black. Of these, 581 were 55 years of age and older. Interviews were conducted by black interviewees in the households of the participants.

The researchers employ a life course perspective in organizing and conceptualizing their material, and they note the limitations of their cross-sectional data in that regard. The last chapter does include data from a 1987 survey of the original sample population and a discussion of change in reported life and health satisfaction, informal help received, church help received, voting behavior, racial identification, and employment status.

Although each chapter focuses on particular hypotheses, all are concerned with the roles and resources that older black Americans command, and the effects of life experiences on those roles and resources. Findings strongly indicate the heterogeneity of the study population; for example, older black Americans who reside in rural areas participate in formal religious organizations more so than do those who live in urban centers (p.113). Findings also suggest ways in which black Americans experience aging differently from white Americans; for examples, the retirement process for black Americans is more influenced by "poor health and disadvantaged labor force experiences, "while for white Americans it is influenced by "financial readiness" (p. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.