Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

Advanced Practice Nursing: Essentials for Role Development

Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

Advanced Practice Nursing: Essentials for Role Development

Article excerpt

Advanced Practice Nursing: Essentials for Role Development by Lucille A. Joel, EdD, RN, APN, C, FMN; Philadelphia: FA. Davis, 2004; 681 pages, $49.95

Lucille Joel's new book is a welcome addition to the few texts available to teach the core concepts of advanced practice. The text is framed around the Essentials for Masters Education in Nursing (American Association of Colleges of Nursing) and the Criteria for Evaluation of Nurse Practitioner Programs (National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Programs). In addition, expert contributors address the non-clinical knowledge necessary for competent advanced practice. The book's four units were judiciously selected after a review of the scope and standards of a variety of advanced practice specialties. This helps bridge the annoying gap that often exists between theory and practice.

Unit 1 begins with the evolution of advanced practice and addresses such topics as the history of advanced practice specialties, emerging roles (including the blended role of CNS/NP), and role development. This reader was pleasantly surprised to find a chapter entitled "Global Perspectives on Advanced Practice." With more attention focused on the globalization of health care, advances in technology, and the complexity of health services, it is imperative that APNs understand the scope and practice of the role in countries other than the United States.

Practice environment issues such as payment, prescriptive authority, credentialing, and malpractice insurance are covered in Unit 2. These chapters will interest students and novice practitioners. Two exceptionally relevant chapters should be studied prior to negotiating a practice arrangement. First, "Reporting Relationships: Follow the Money," addresses the critical issues of reporting alignment and reimbursement and asks specifically, "Can the position pay for itself?" Examples that attempt to clarify the business side of practice will be helpful to the practitioner who has received a pink slip with the explanation, "We can no longer afford you." The relationship between who pays the APN's salary and who has the ultimate authority to create, define, and influence the APN's role is clarified. …

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