Academic journal article Magistra

Wilt Thou Go on My Errand? Three 18th Century Journals of Quaker Women's Writings 1650-1700; Hidden in Plain Sight Quaker Women's Writings 1650-1700

Academic journal article Magistra

Wilt Thou Go on My Errand? Three 18th Century Journals of Quaker Women's Writings 1650-1700; Hidden in Plain Sight Quaker Women's Writings 1650-1700

Article excerpt

Bacon, Margaret Hope, ad. (Wallingford, PA: Pendle Hill Publications, 1994), 400 Pp, index, notes, bibliography, paper, $16.00, ISBN 0-87574-921-6.

Garman, Mary, Judith Applegate, Margaret Benefiel & Dortha Meredith, eds. (Wallingford, Penn: Pendle Hill Publications, 1996), 540 Pp, index, notes, paper, $20.00, ISBN 0-87574-923-2.

The Religious Society of Friends movement encouraged the full partnership of women and men, hence encouraging the full development of women in the economic and religious spheres. Women of the Quaker movement became models of their own unique religious leadership. It is fortunate that many of their writings survived.

Margaret Bacon, in Wilt Thou Go On My Errand?, focuses on three Quaker women who served as traveling ministers. She gives an introduction to each and then "steps back" and allows their very readable journals to speak for themselves.

Traveling ministers kept daily journals of their work so they could account for their activities and monies spent upon their return. These journals reveal much of the heart and mind of the traveling ministers.

Susanna Morris (1682-1755) was born in England and raised in Pennsylvania. Married and the mother of thirteen children, Susanna made numerous trips around America and three trips to Europe. Susanna felt called strongly to these missionary trips, not allowing age to slow her down.

Elizabeth Hudson (1722-1783) was wealthy and well educated. She was born into a prominent Philadelphia Quaker family. Elizabeth was not pressured into marriage, and instead made her first overseas mission at age twenty-five. Elizabeth developed a passion for books and her writing reveals both the sophistication of her education and her self-confidence. Although she sought to remain simple and humble, Elizabeth seemed to be very aware of the upper class who attended her meetings. …

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