Academic journal article Journal of Comparative Family Studies

Parenting Style and Academic Achievement for East Indian and Canadian Adolescents*

Academic journal article Journal of Comparative Family Studies

Parenting Style and Academic Achievement for East Indian and Canadian Adolescents*

Article excerpt

Adolescent academic achievement has been linked to several influences distinctive to the home environment, such as parental involvement (Hickman. Greenwood. & Miller. 1995: Steinberg. Lamborn. Dornbusch. & Darline. 1992). f'amilv cohesion (Hein & Lewko. 1994). parent control and discipline strategies, and affective warmth (Steinbere. Lamborn. Darline. Mounts. & Dornbusch. 1994: Steinbere et al.. 1992). Baumrind (1991) used the dimensions of control/demandineness (C). and warmth/responsiveness (W) to derive a four-fold classification of parenting style. In the authoritarian style (high C. low W). parents place great value on obedience and discipline. In the authoritative style (hieh C and W). parents set rules but are willine to explain the reasons for rules and are open to discussion. The permissive indulgent parent (low C. high W) has a lax attitude toward parenting and/or fails to provide rules for the child's behavior. Permissive neelectful parents (low C and W) do not structure and monitor, are not supportive, or may be actively reacting.

Research conducted in North America has consistently shown that both authoritarian and permissive parenting, neglectful in particular, are associated with poorer psvchosocial development and academic performance in children (Dornbusch. Ritter. Leiderman. Roberts, & Fraleigh. 1987: Steinbere et al.. 1992: Steinbere et al.. 1994). In contrast, a democratic, authoritative style appears to promote child competence and adjustment. The children of authoritative parents tend to score higher on psychococial measures and academics than those of authoritarian or permissive parents (Glasgow. Dornbusch. Troyer, Steinberg. & Ritter. 1997: Jones. Forehand. & Beach. 2000: Steinbere et al.. 1994). Much of this work has been based on samples of white, European American families, and Western measures of parenting style.

Studies includine ethnic minoritv children/adolescents have found sienificant variations in the association between parentme style and academic achievement. Specifically, weak or inconsistent relationships between Baumnnd's parentme stvles and academic scores have been demonstrated for African American. Hispanic American, and Asian American students (Chao, 1994; 2001 ; Dornbusch et al., 1987; Steinberg, Mounts, Lamborn, & Dornbusch, 1991 Steinberg et al.. 1992). Authoritarian parenting in these studies was often associated with higher achievement for Asian American samples. There have also been mixed results with respect to parental involvement with schooling. Schneider and Lee (1990) have reported Asian American parents to be highly involved in their children's schooling whereas Steinberg et al. (1992) have found them to be less involved than European American parents.

Results from North American investigations using ethnic minorities have often challenged the assumption of cultural universals in stylistic influence. Chao (1994; 2001) has suggested that ethnic differences in the effects of parenting style may be due to the way that parenting style has been conceived. Parenting style as based on Baumrind's typologies may not have the same meaning when examined from an ethnic perspective. There could be cultural distinctions in how the traditional Western dimensions are defined. For example, parental behavior that exemplifies the authoritarian style (e.g.. control) is more commonly found among traditional Eastern societies (Roopnarine & Hossain, 1992). This style is often positively associated with academic achievement within these cultures. The authoritarian style. then, may serve the adaptive function of preparing children for their social/achievement roles (Ellis & Petersen, 1992). There is the possibility that varied culture-specific patterns of practice are not captured by the standard typologies.

Empirical work linking parenting, family characteristics, and young adolescents' academic achievement for ethnic samples is limited in both the Eastern and Western worlds (Carson. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.