Academic journal article et Cetera

The Meaning of It All: Thoughts of a Citizen-Scientist

Academic journal article et Cetera

The Meaning of It All: Thoughts of a Citizen-Scientist

Article excerpt

Richard P. Feynman. The Meaning of It All: Thoughts of a Citizen-Scientist. Reading, MA: Perseus, 1998.

In April 1963, Richard P. Feynman - a Nobel prize-winning physicist and polymath, who was at various times an artist, a dancer, a bongo player, and a repairer of radios - was invited to give a three-night series of lectures at the University of Washington in Seattle. This book contains those lectures.

Feynman's first lecture was titled "The Uncertainty of Science." In it, he talks about the dual effects that science can have on the world. For example, scientific technology improves production, but we have trouble with automation. It brings about advances in medicine, but then we worry about the number of births and the fact that no one dies from the diseases we have eliminated. It produces rapid air transportation, but it also makes possible the severe horrors of air war. In a sense, Feynman argues, science is like a key that can open the gates to heaven or hell. Which portal the key unlocks depends on the humans who employ it.

In lecture two, "The Uncertainty of Values," Feynman argues that at the worst times in human history, many people believed in something with absolute dogmatic faith. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.