Academic journal article The Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies

Race Relations in America: Forty Years after the "Civil Rights Revolution" -- Paved with Good Intentions: The Failure of Race Relations in Contemporary America by Jared Taylor

Academic journal article The Journal of Social, Political, and Economic Studies

Race Relations in America: Forty Years after the "Civil Rights Revolution" -- Paved with Good Intentions: The Failure of Race Relations in Contemporary America by Jared Taylor

Article excerpt

Paved With Good Intentions: The Failure of Race Relations in Contemporary America

by Jared Taylor

Carroll & Graf Publishers, Inc., 1992

$22.95 hardback, 416 pages

ISBN No. 0-88184-886-2

The Washington Post, dated 22 October 1995, has reported that following a recent Supreme Court decision, the U.S. military have decided to annul as unconstitutional a program that had been in force since 1988, by which if two more bids for military contracts were received from "minority" firms (usually firms controlled by ethnic minorities) it was obligatory that the contract be given to a minority supplier. This program ensured that contracts worth over a billion dollars a year would necessarily be given to ethnic minority business interests to the exclusion of white-controlled firms no matter who was the lowest bidder or the more efficient supplier. A strong reaction against affirmative action programs in government contracts and in educational opportunities which penalized whites in the United States is presently underway, and this is resulting in a major realignment of the U.S. political scene.

After many years of struggling together against the major trends of twentieth century welfare statism, the varying points of view that make up the American Right are experiencing splits over several issues, but one in particular will be of fundamental significance in the long term. This split is perhaps best illustrated by the article Dinesh D'Souza, the John M. Olin fellow at the American Enterprise Institute and author of the recent book The End of Racism which repeats many of the points made in the book by Jared Taylor that is being reviewed here, wrote for the Opinion section of the Washington Post on September 24, 1995. In it, D'Souza attacks Taylor and others (such as Lawrence Auster, author of The Path to National Suicide, and columnist Samuel Francis) as embracing "a new spirit of white bigotry." Why? Because they have concluded that if American civilization is to continue in anything like its past form, it is imperative that white Americans regain a consciousness of and loyalty to their own racial identity not unlike that held by people of all other ethnicities. In contrast, D'Souza calls on Americans "to unite

instead

behind a race-neutral banner."

The division between these points of view is of immense importance and should become the subject of open and reasoned debate. By participating in this debate, D'Souza renders a useful service, from which he detracts greatly by his characterization of those who disagree with him. For thinkers of the quality of Taylor, Auster and Francis, bigotry has nothing to do with it.

The issue has many facets, but the central question is one of the heart, and will unavoidably be answered, either directly or by default, by all Americans (of any race or background): Do Americans value the civilization they have had, and want to see its main contours continue into the future? Or do they place little value on it and feel themselves willing instead to see it supplanted by a civilization bearing the stamp primarily of cultures and heritages from Latin America, Asia and Africa?

To say that only the latter is a respectable opinion, and that loyalty to the civilization Americans have known is "bigotry," are assertions that in themselves demonstrate how far America has come toward the dissolution of its former identity. As recently as thirty years ago, it would have been unthinkable. America's mainstream and heritage were established facts, and hardly seemed threatened. If anyone had suggested that a multiethnic cauldron from all the nations of the world should take its place, consigning it to a reviled memory, and that anything else represents "bigotry," the suggestion would have struck most Americans as as ludicrous as it is vicious.

Along the same lines, when we refer to the "American mainstream and heritage," we again speak of something about which perceptions have undergone change. …

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