Academic journal article Texas Law Review

Corwin Waggoner Johnson

Academic journal article Texas Law Review

Corwin Waggoner Johnson

Article excerpt

Corwin Johnson was a pillar on the University of Texas Law School faculty for over half a century. He joined our faculty in 1947, and except for brief sojourns as a highly coveted visiting professor at leading law schools around the country, he taught here right up until his death last year. Without the benefit of his intelligence, wit, or cherubic face, UT Law School is nearly unthinkable.

Corwin was of what Tom Brokaw rightly calls "The Greatest Generation." The men and women of that era grew up in the Great Depression, served their country in World War II, and then rolled up their sleeves to make America and their local communities better places. Corwin certainly did that for our Law School.

When I arrived in 1977, Corwin was in his prime. At 60, he was a senior member of the faculty, but he showed no signs of resting on his laurels or slowing down. Corwin was part of a stellar group of professors who joined our faculty after the War, and who formed a foundation Page Keeton could build on when he became Dean in 1949. Corwin was one of those professors who brought our law school into national prominence. His casebook on Property Law is still in use throughout the country, and his scholarly writings in property law and water law brought national recognition to him and to our law school.

Oddly and perversely, legal academics sometimes think they must choose between national prominence and local involvement, between teaching and scholarship, and between the academy and the profession. …

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