Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Editing Robert Grosseteste

Academic journal article Medium Aevum

Editing Robert Grosseteste

Article excerpt

Editing Robert Grosseteste, ed. Evelyn A. Mackie and Joseph Goering (Toronto, Buffalo, NY, and London: University of Toronto Press, 2003). xv + 208 pp. ISBN 0-8020-8841-4. $39.95/£25.00.

This book is a report of a conference held in Toronto on the theme 'Editing Robert Grosseteste'. The papers published here indicate the significance of the conference for understanding Robert Grosseteste. James McEvoy's masterly paper 'Robert Grosseteste: the man and his legacy' shows the breadth of Robert Grosseteste's interests, learning, and what modern people would call his in-service education. James Ginther takes up the long-neglected matter of Robert Grosseteste as a theologian in 'The Super Psalterium in context'. If Robert Grosseteste were alive today and had to indicate his academic field, this is the one he would choose over all his scientific, mathematical, cosmological, and practical interests, important although they were, for Robert Grosseteste was first and foremost a pastor concerned with the care of people whether they were his Franciscan students, or the people of his diocese, or his priests, or anyone in his circle. Evelyn Mackie in her description of the complex task of editing the Anglo-Norman text of a poem, Le Château d'Amour, shows the pastoral bent of this work, indicating its possible creation for the Franciscans. In 'Robert Grosseteste and the Corpus Dionysiacum', Candice Taylor Quinn elegantly indicates Robert Grosseteste's approach to translation linguistically, theologically, and spiritually. As Jerome did, so Grosseteste took the work of translation as indicating total meaning rather than being a literal account. 'Robert Grosseteste's notes on the physics', by Neil Lewis, indicates again the sheer breadth of Grosseteste's academic interests and further illustrates his method of working, the complexity of the manuscripts themselves, of their copying, and of their usage by other scholars and students, mostly of the fourteenth century with the exception of Richard Rufus of Cornwall and Adam of Buckfield. …

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