Academic journal article Family Relations

A Theory-Based Parent Competency Model Incorporating Intervention Attendance Effects

Academic journal article Family Relations

A Theory-Based Parent Competency Model Incorporating Intervention Attendance Effects

Article excerpt

This study tests a parent competency model that incorporates the effects of attendance in a parenting skills training intervention. Observational and self-report data from 209 families participating in a controlled study were used to test the model. Results generally supported the modeL for both mothers and fathers. Analyses also confirmed that child management behaviors mediated both parent conventionality and intervention attendance effects on affective quality, although these results differed for mothers and fathers.

A THEORY-BASED PARENT COMPETENCY MODEL INCORPORATING INTERVENTION ATTENDANCE EFFECTS* Richard Spoth and Cleve Redmond"

The primary objective of the study reported in this article was to test a theory-based model of variables expected to influence protective parentchild interactions, including the effect of attendance in a skills training intervention intended to strengthen these interactions. Constructs related to protective parent-child interactions figure prominently in family interactional theory (Brook, Brook, Gordon, Whiteman, & Cohen, 1990) and in the social development model (Catalano & Hawkins, in press; Hawkins & Weis, 1985). These two theoretical formulations provide the conceptual framework for the model tested in this study. Family interactional theory guided specification of the paths of influence among predictors of parentchild interactions; the social development model suggested the inclusion of skills training attendance effects. Both of these theoretical formulations address the role of protective parent competencies in the etiology of adolescent problem behaviors.

Parent competencies figure prominently in the etiology of adolescent problem behaviors (e.g., Brook et al., 1990; Dishion, Patterson, Stoolmiller, & Skinner, 1991; Hawkins, Catalano, & Miller, 1992; Institute of Medicine, 1994; Patterson, Reid, & Dishion, 1992). In addition to empirically-based risk factors that have been shown to directly increase the probability of adolescent problem behaviors, there are a number of parenting-related protective factors that can offset risk factor effects. Protective factors have frequently been described as those that either (a) mitigate the effects of exposure to risk factors (Catalano & Hawkins, in press; Farrington et al., 1990; Hawkins et al., 1992; Masten, in press; Masten, Best, & Garmezy, 1991; Rutter, 1990) or (b) reduce the likelihood that a risk factor will occur (Coie et al., 1993; Rutter, 1990). As noted in a recent report on risk reduction for mental disorders by the Institute of Medicine (1994), the quality of parent-child interactions is a major protective factor for a range of disorders, including adolescent substance abuse and antisocial conduct. In particular, effective child management behaviors and affective quality in parent-child interactions can serve as protective factors (Benard, 1991; Coie et al., 1993; Conger, Reuter, & Conger, in press; Coombs & Landsverk, 1988; Gest, Neeman, Hubbard, Masten, & Tellegen, 1993; Institute of Medicine, 1994; Masten, in press; Rutter, 1990; Stouthamer-Loeber et al., 1993).

The study reported in this article sampled families with sixth and seventh graders because enhancing protective factors in the family environment can be particularly important as children enter the early adolescent, middle school years. The increased importance of peers as a socialization force and the transition from elementary to middle school environments can increase child exposure to a variety of risk factors (Catalano & Hawkins, in press; Eccles et al., 1993; Simmons & Blyth, 1987). Moreover, because young adolescents in rural families who are experiencing economic stress are more likely to be exposed to familyrelated risks (e.g., poor child management practices) than young adolescents in rural families without economic stress (Conger et al., 1992), the families in this study were selected from an economically stressed rural area. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.