Academic journal article Family Relations

Exemplary Social Intervention Programs for Members and Their Families

Academic journal article Family Relations

Exemplary Social Intervention Programs for Members and Their Families

Article excerpt

Guttman, David, and Sussman, Marvin B. (Eds.). (1995). Exemplary Social Intervention Programs for Members and Their Families. New York: Haworth Press. 179 pp. Hardcover ISBN 1-56024-707-X, price $19.95.

The purpose of this book is to describe several exemplary social intervention programs that have attempted, and generally succeeded, in making a difference to their participants. Many of these programs attribute their success to unsung heroes-ordinary people whose goal is to make a difference in the lives of their clients. Kirshbaum describes a notable example of this-an agency whose roots are in the disability independent living movement-in a chapter that will be particularly helpful to anyone working with people with disabilities and their families. Another example, described by Sharlin and Shamai, is a therapeutic program model within the context of the Department of Social Services in Haifa, Israel. They give excellent case illustrations of the presenting problems, describe therapeutic techniques employed, and include a policy and program analysis.

Exemplary programs should include a rigorous and systematic evaluation component, a criterion few of these programs meet. Even when evaluations were conducted, as in Fausel's innovative program using the Stress Inoculation Training (SIT) model with stepcouples, the evaluation does not focus on program outcomes. Fausel acknowledges this fact, however, and states that the goal of this project was to design the program to adapt SIT to the steppopulation and to obtain some preliminary feedback from the participants so that other participants could use this adaptation. Three of the chapters do not seem to belong in this book in that they do not describe programs. Harel's chapter on the needs of aging Holocaust survivors is informative and provides insight to social workers and others working with this population. Landau argues that new medical technologies in human reproduction may lead to child maltreatment, abuse, neglect, or abandonment. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.