Academic journal article Southeast Asian Affairs

Background

Academic journal article Southeast Asian Affairs

Background

Article excerpt

The Barisan Nasional (BN, or National Front) coalition government of Dr Mahathir Mohamad faced one of its toughest challenges to political survival in the wake of the 1999 general election, which exposed the prospect of disintegration of the political monopoly held by the United Malays National Organization (UMNO) in Malaysian politics since independence in 1957. In that election, the dominant Malay ruling party suffered its greatest setback --- with UMNO's parliamentary representation dropping from 94 to 72 seats in the 193-seat Parliament --- in addition to the defeat of four UMNO Cabinet ministers and five deputy ministers --- the lowest number ever.1 What has been most disquieting to party members is the fact that UMNO's ability to lead the BN has been boosted by non-Malay votes, especially Chinese and Indian, through support for the Malaysian Chinese Association (MCA), Gerakan Rakyat Malaysia (Malaysian People's Movement), and Malaysian Indian Congress (MIC) candidates at parliamentary and state levels.2 The BN's two-thirds majority of 148 seats reflects a contribution largely by non-Malay voters, including those in Sabah and Sarawak. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.