Academic journal article American Journal of Psychotherapy

Dream Telepathy: Experiments in Nocturnal Extrasensory Perception

Academic journal article American Journal of Psychotherapy

Dream Telepathy: Experiments in Nocturnal Extrasensory Perception

Article excerpt

MONTAGUE ULLMAN AND STANLEY KRIPOPNER, WITH ALAN VAUGHAN: Dream Telepathy: Experiments in Nocturnal Extrasensory Perception. Charlottesville, VA: Hampton Rods, 2003, 274 pp., $16.95, ISBN 1-57174-321-9.

This book is one of a series of books on paranormal experiences collected under the rubric of "Studies in Consciousness/Russell Targ Editions." It is a reprint of a volume originally published in 1973, with new introductions by the senior authors. In this volume the authors attempt to link their dream laboratory findings regarding telepathic and precognitive dreams to the work of physicists who have experimentally demonstrated the existence of nonlocal physical effects. They also review some of the writings of physicists who have postulated hidden levels of physical reality and suggest that they may well be the locale in which extrasensory communication is feasible.

The substance of the book begins with an historical survey of critics of telepathy on one side and on the other, those who have, over the centuries, reported admittedly uncontrolled telepathic and precognitive dreams that have convinced them that these phenomena are quite real and not statistical artifacts or matters of chance. A large number of these anecdotes involve the visualization of dream images which involved people of great emotional importance to the dreamer and spoke for concurrent or soon-to-occur catastrophic events.

The bulk of the text may be summed up as a detailed description of the many experiments conducted by the authors using a standard dream laboratory setting, an awake telepathic sender in one room or building, and a sleeping receiver in another room or building. Making use of rapid eye movements as signaling dreaming, the authors were able to collect a multitude of dreams from each of their receivers. Neutral raters were then asked to view a set of pictures and to rate each picture as to the likelihood that it was the picture that had been used in that night's experiment. By and large, using standard statistics, the authors found that most receiver-dreamers, and especially those who believed in paranormal phenomena, have clear telepathic abilities. …

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