Academic journal article Family Relations

The 33rd Annual National Council on Family Relations Media Awards Competition

Academic journal article Family Relations

The 33rd Annual National Council on Family Relations Media Awards Competition

Article excerpt

The 33rd Annual National Council on Family Relations Media Awards Competition*

The 33rd annual National Council on Family Relations (NCFR) Media Competition was hosted by the Department of Family and Child Ecology and the College of Human Ecology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, during June and July of 2001. The purpose of the annual competition is to evaluate the quality and conceptual content of videos, to endorse excellence in the production of films with themes relevant to family issues, to promote the effective use of these resources, to encourage high standards in the development of creative learning opportunities, and to disseminate media competition results.

Entries received were placed in one of the following 14 subject categories: Addiction/Substance Abuse; Aging; Contemporary Social Issues; Families With Special Needs; Family Violence/Abuse; Human Development; Marital and Family Issues and Communication; Mental Health, Stress, Transitions, and Crisis Management; Diverse Family Systems; Parenting Issues; Sexuality and Sex Role Development; Teenage Pregnancy and Sexuality; STD/AIDS; and Other (Public Service Announcements).

Guidelines for submission required that all videos be firsttime entries in the competition and carry a release date of no earlier than January 1, 2000. Multiple entries for producer/distributor within categories were permissible. All entries were to be received by April 1, 2001. In addition to half-inch videocassette recordings, entries could also be submitted on CD-ROM if available.

The judging panels included university faculty, graduate students, and undergraduate students from several academic departments at Michigan State University (e.g., Family and Child Ecology, Psychology) and Michigan State University Extension.

A total of 101 entries (99 videotapes and 2 CD-ROMs) were received. Following the viewing of each entry, judges were asked to independently make both quantitative (79 possible points) and qualitative assessments. The evaluation form consisted of four major quantitative categories designed to measure the entries based on (a) content (30 possible points); (b) general issues (9 possible points), which included length, pacing, and flow of media entry; (c) artistic quality (20 possible points); and (d) ability to meet stated goals (20 possible points). This evaluation was followed by an overall rating (the sum of the four categories) and a qualitative section.

The winners listed here are honored for entries in the educational and commercial/entertainment categories or a combination of these categories. In addition, recognition is given to the runner-up and the honorable mention recipient for each topic, regardless of categorical grouping, on the basis of numerical rankings of the videos as determined by preestablished criteria.

The following list identifies the winner(s), the runner-up, and the honorable mention recipient for each of the 14 topics. The synopsis, goals, and objectives of each entry were provided by the video's producer/director and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the NCFR, the competition coordinators, or the judges. Purchase and rental prices are provided courtesy of the producers. The entrants noted their intended audiences.

1. Addiction/Substance Abuse

* Winner (Educational): Spit Tobacco Exposed (15:00). Producer: John G. Young, Human Relations Media, 41 Kensico Drive, Mount Kisco, NY 10549. Distributor: Human Relations Media, 41 Kensico Drive, Mount Kisco, NY 10549. Web site: www.hrmvideo.com. Purchase price: $94.95.

Audience: Junior High

Synopsis: The video reveals through interviews with users, former users, and cancer patients, that chewing tobacco is a distinctive habit that often causes serious health problems and puts young people at great risk for early disease and death. Stark footage shows some of the devastating damage that spit tobacco does to teeth, gums, and mouths. …

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