Academic journal article Manager

How to Motivate Your Team

Academic journal article Manager

How to Motivate Your Team

Article excerpt

No matter where you sit in an organisation, teamwork is a vital element of work culture. Creating and leading a team and then motivating those individuals to work together towards a common goal is not as simple as saying "just get on with it". Get it wrong and badly functioning teams can slow down or even damage business growth.

Luckily, there are experts and business leaders who are all too happy to help with advice, training and real life anecdotes. Talk with them and you will soon find that even if you have the obvious monetary rewards in place and the correct salary levels for the individuals in the team, there is so much more to team management than hard cash and targets. Penny Davenport, for instance, is a career mentor and business coach. She utilises a unique programme, which includes a personality test allowing individuals to identify their communication style, strengths and weaknesses and ultimately motivate them in their roles.

"An effective team will be absolutely 100 per cent clear on their goal. Ideally, teams are structured so that everyone has a clear role and brings something unique and valuable to the table," she explains. "Knowing your role, and what everyone else has to do, is a great way of ensuring you are firing on all cylinders. This isn't always easy to achieve though and sometimes you have to make the best of what you have. This means that the Team Leader needs to set a tone of good collaboration and understanding, right from the top."

For this reason it is vitally important people understand their role within a team, so they can perform as closely to, or even surpass their manager's expectations. This is echoed by Helena Mann, Operations Manager at Crunch Accounting, an online accountancy service, which employs 145 people looking after around 5,700 customers. She believes a lot of successful team management comes down to recognising individual needs and placing people in teams with similar personality types.

"If we see that individuals in a team are not engaged, or are not meeting their personal targets, we will talk to them one-on-one and discover what will help them to get involved more and work harder," she explains. "Often it's just a case of clashing personalities and teams may need to be re-shuffled accordingly. …

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