Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

NLN Biennial Survey of Schools of Nursing Academic Year 2015–2016: Executive Summary

Academic journal article Nursing Education Perspectives

NLN Biennial Survey of Schools of Nursing Academic Year 2015–2016: Executive Summary

Article excerpt

Policy-makers, planners, governmental agencies, regulators, and others use National League for Nursing (NLN) workforce data as they design legislation, approve budgets, and formulate long-range educational goals. The 2016 NLN Biennial Survey of Schools of Nursing was conducted to provide such data.

This report is compiled from data provided by 655 schools of nursing, 55 percent of 1,197 NLN member schools; 44 percent of the responding institutions offer baccalaureate or higher degrees in nursing, and 56 percent offer associate degree, diploma, and PN/VN programs. The following are the highlights of the findings; details are online at www.nln.org/newsroom/nursingeducation-statistics.

DEMOGRAPHICS

According to NLN data, the percentage of racial-ethnic minority students enrolled in prelicensure RN programs increased slightly from 26 percent in 2012 to 27 percent in 2016. Specifically, African American enrollment dipped, from 12.9 percent to 10.8 percent, whereas Hispanic enrollment increased, from 6.8 to 8.1 percent. Asian or Pacific Islander, and American Indian enrollment decreased slightly by 0.1 percent.

Enrollment of men in basic RN programs decreased by 1 percent in 2016 compared to 2012; men represented 14 percent of the total enrollment. BSN programs had the highest percentage of men enrolled (15 percent), an increase from 13 percent in 2012; PN/VN programs had the least percentage of men enrolled (9 percent), down from 12 percent in 2012.

Findings from the 2016 NLN Biennial Survey indicate that the age of doctoral students in nursing programs continues to fall. The proportion of doctoral students over age 30 declined by 5 percent, from 87 percent in 2011 to 82 percent in 2016. Findings indicate that the trend toward late entry into doctoral programs in nursing may be reversing.

PROGRAMS THAT TURNED AWAY QUALIFIED APPLICANTS

The data indicate that significant numbers of applicants to prelicensure programs continue to be turned away; as US nursing schools work to maintain the RN workforce supply, these findings are troublesome. The most dramatic findings occurred in PN/VN and diploma programs where qualified applicants declined 13 percent and 24 percent, respectively. BSRN program rejections increased from 3 percent in 2014 to 6 percent in 2016. …

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