Academic journal article Delta Kappa Gamma Bulletin

From the Editor

Academic journal article Delta Kappa Gamma Bulletin

From the Editor

Article excerpt

At the heart of cultural proficiency is an understanding and acceptance of diversity-an ability not only to recognize and appreciate the differences between and among individuals and groups but also to interact effectively with those who differ from us. These differences may be in race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status, age, physical ability, cognitive ability, or religious or political beliefs-to name just a few of the many areas of diversity. In education, such proficiency is required to teach and interact with students successfully and to work effectively with parents and colleagues. In their seminal work, Cultural Proficiency: A Manual for School Leaders, Lindsey, Robins, and Terrell (2003) noted that culturally proficient leaders in educational settings can "improve staff and student morale by improving the effectiveness of communication, reducing complaints, and creating a more comfortable and rewarding climate for all people in the school" (p. 14). Indeed, they further argued that cultural proficiency allows leaders to develop "new initiatives, curricula, programs, and activities that will enrich school life for all students and staff" (p. 4). It is within this context that authors in this issue address the theme: Culturally Proficient Leaders.

A culturally proficient leader must understand differences and create a welcoming environment for all students. Editorial board member Pollard opens the issue with an interview of Dr. Jeffrey Gruen of Yale University, who specializes in studying the role of genetics in reading disabilities, particularly dyslexia. His work is an example of an initiative that may help educators to understand children who are "different" by virtue of their learning disabilities and to create a more comfortable experience and environment for them. To help leaders develop a welcoming environment in general, Matyo-Cepero, Varvisotis, and Lilienthal explore how using the tenets of invitational education, which is readily found at elementary and secondary levels, can also enrich the lives of students and staff in higher education.

A culturally proficient leader also recognizes cultural changes that make a difference in the lives of students. In this light, McClanahan reflects on how teacher educators can prepare young professionals to adapt to the interests and needs of students raised in an ever-evolving technological culture. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.