Academic journal article Journal of Research in Educational Sciences

Student Enthusiasm as a Key Determinant of Their Performance

Academic journal article Journal of Research in Educational Sciences

Student Enthusiasm as a Key Determinant of Their Performance

Article excerpt

1. Introduction

The issue of student academic performance in many universities setup has engross huge attention in the literature. Various scholars have considered a lots of factors associated with these performance particularly in modern literatures (see Chambers and Schreiber 2004, Alfan and Othman 2005, Krashen 2005, Bergin and Reilly 2006, Thapa 2011). But many studies look beyond people's kin career, because they emphasize more on socioeconomic variables as a key determinant of performance, which serve as a yardstick for them to venture into their areas of specialization. (see Dynan and Rouse 1997, Betts and Morell 1999, Chambers and Schreiber 2004, Rask 2010, Ogbemudia and Aiasa 2013, Nam 2014)

It's quite obvious and pertinent to see how individual performance increases or decreases overtime, with individual kin interest in that particular programme. The desire to pursue a lifetime career in various fields of interest among the Nigerian populace has been on increase overtime (Tawari and Koko 1996, Lough 2010), which is not favoured by the current nature of educational system. In recent years, the educational system of Nigerian do not provide adequate ground for the youths to display their skills and talents in their desired field (Pandey and Tiwari 2014, Laleye 2015), either due to their early poor economic status and pre-tertiary educational background, or due to some circumstances surrounding their intake into tertiary institutions as some candidate choice of school and programme of study does not actualise. Each year, more than one million Nigerian school-leavers (about 63% of the population under the age of 24) are struggling to gain admission into tertiary institutions (Clark 2013). While at tertiary level alone, the number of students have grown from under 15,000 in 1970 to approximately 1.2 million in 2012 (see Clark 2013, Oshemughen and Oghuvbu 2013). In 2013 alone about 1.7 million students registered for Nigeria's centralised tertiary admission examinations, all competing for the half million places available; potentially leaving over a million qualified college-age Nigerians without a post-secondary place. (Clark 2013)

The quest for admission warrant these half a million to undertake any programme given to them by most university management, some of them tends not to be comfortable with the programme given to them, therefore, diminishing their enthusiasm. Originally, this enthusiasm by applicants can serve as a foundation on how students can build on already exiting core and values of the programme to be studied. But most of these egos are either altered due to students' educational background, parental commitment towards education or most school management (Akiwowo et al. 2011). This further affects their performance, and at the end some students turn out to be a dropout from institution. Performances normally determine whether a student can pursue higher education and contribute to the society or not (Hossain 2012). Most often, successful admitted students into higher institution of learning normally face either or both internal and external factors, which in-turn affects performance. The internal factors range from nature of programme under study, age group influence, adequate manpower, etc (Khonbi and Sadeghi 2012, Sabitova 2014, Zhan et al. 2015); while the external factors consist of parental level of income, educational background of parent, educational background of the candidate and nature of region (Tomul and Celik 2009, Misran et al. 2012, Ummet 2015).

This study further looked at the internal factors that are enthusiastic in nature; they include the programme status before and after application, the decision to read a particular programme and the department under which the student is studying. Earlier studies focused on teachers' enthusiasm by looking at their nature of excitement in the programmes taught by them (see Muzenda 2013, Eren 2012). But study like Kim and Schallert (2014) looked at the mediating effects of students' perceptions of teacher enthusiasm and that of peer enthusiasm in United State; though this study is more specific, as it only concentrate on students' enthusiasm, where change of programmes in the university system affect students' prudence. …

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