Academic journal article College Composition and Communication

From the Editor

Academic journal article College Composition and Communication

From the Editor

Article excerpt

Colleagues:

This issue of College Composition and Communication pushes hard at the borders of what we know about writing and the teaching of writing, particularly as writing pedagogies and literacy development are always situated themselves within social, personal, and political domains and ecologies. Articles in this issue throw the complexities of those domains into stark relief, beginning with Heather Bastian's "Student Affective Responses to 'Bringing the Funk' in the First-Year Writing Classroom," which asks us to think more carefully and critically about students' affective responses when asked to write in academic contexts. Bastian reminds us that we are never just asking our students to "enter conversations," but to experiment with different selves-a process that inevitably produces many different thoughts andfeelings. Working with and through disturbing feelings is a key component of Laurie Grobman's "Disturbing Public Memory in Community Writing Partnerships." Grobman details how she, her students, and her community partners had to confront feelings of distress and shame when working on writing together and in the community.

David M. Grant and Steven Fraiberg extend the conversation about the complexity of working and writing together by highlighting cultural dimensions in literate and rhetorical action. Grant's "Writing Wakan: The Lakota Pipe as Rhetorical Object" offers an important call to reconsider how indigenous rhetorics, through an analysis of the chanupa, or ceremonial pipe, might challenge what we know about the making of selves and community. …

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