Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Yankee Bishops: Apostles in the New Republic, 1783 to 1873

Academic journal article The Catholic Historical Review

Yankee Bishops: Apostles in the New Republic, 1783 to 1873

Article excerpt

Yankee Bishops: Apostles in the New Republic, 1783 to 1873. By Charles R. Henery. [Studies in Episcopal and Anglican Theology, Volume 7.] (New York: Charles Lang. 2016. Pp. xxiv, 352. $93.95. ISBN 978-1-4331-2361-0.)

Readers of this volume should be aware of two elements that are not entirely evident from the title. First, the bishops that are the subject of this volume are bishops of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America (more commonly known by the shorter title as the Episcopal Church). There is little or no reference to the bishops of the Roman Catholic Church, the Orthodox Church, the Methodist church, or to any other denomination in America that made use of the title "bishop" in the period covered by the study. This work is the seventh volume in the Studies in Episcopal and Anglican Theology series for which C. K. Robertson serves as the general editor. It is an internal denominational study that looks at the establishment and growth of the episcopate following the American Revolution in one church from that church's sources.

The second element in the title that may not be immediately evident to all readers is that the term "Yankee" is used as a synonym for "American" and not as a descriptor of a particular geographic region within the United States. As Henery explains in the introduction, "the title of this book comes from the British usage of the term 'Yankee' to refer to American bishops in the nineteenth century" (p. 6). Henery surveys the first hundred bishops ordained to serve the Episcopal Church, regardless of where they served in the United States or in the overseas mission field.

Henery organizes his material in seven chapters. Two initial chapters focus on the establishment and expansion of an American episcopate before (chap. 1) and after (chap. 2) the year 1811. The dividing date is one that has long been used in Episcopal histories to distinguish early bishops who had experience in the colonial Anglican Church from a younger second generation that came to maturity after the Revolution. …

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