Academic journal article The Arkansas Historical Quarterly

Book and Media Notes

Academic journal article The Arkansas Historical Quarterly

Book and Media Notes

Article excerpt

Explore the history of a groundbreaking Arkansas school through a new online exhibit, "Lives Transformed: The People of Southland College," mounted by the University of Arkansas Libraries, Fayetteville. Founded in the mid-1860s in Phillips County by Indiana Quakers and largely constructed by black Union troops, Southland College stood out as the first institution of higher education for African Americans west of the Mississippi River. The school's enrollment reached two hundred in the 1870s and peaked at almost five hundred in 1917. After almost sixty years of teaching its students, preparing many for careers in the professions, including education, the school closed in 1925. The online exhibit features a selection of Southland materials gathered by the late Thomas C. Kennedy, including photographs, letters, a copy of the school newspaper, an application for admission, and an 1876 diploma. "Lives Transformed" is available at digitalcollections.uark.edu.

Those who are anxiously awaiting the establishment of an Arkansas Reconstruction Sesquicentennial Commission to properly commemorate this transformative episode in the life of the state and its communities (such as through the placement of historical markers in every county) will welcome, in the meantime, the Butler Center for Arkansas Studies' online Arkansas and Reconstruction project. It includes a comprehensive timeline of important moments between 1862 and 1877 in the emancipation and enfranchisement of the state and nation's African-American population, as well as the political changes and backlash these developments inspired. Go to www. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.