Academic journal article Delta Kappa Gamma Bulletin

From the Editor

Academic journal article Delta Kappa Gamma Bulletin

From the Editor

Article excerpt

Educator, author, and businessman Stephen Covey once offered this provocative thought about perception:

Each of us tends to think we see things as they are, that we are objective. But this is not the case. We see the world, not as it is, but as we are-or, as we are conditioned to see it. When we open our mouths to describe what we see, we in effect describe ourselves, our perceptions, our paradigms (The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, 2004, p. 28).

Included in the "conditioning" that shapes one's perceptions-that, in effect, shapes one's sense of self-are factors associated with the era in which one comes of age. The power of such generational identity and the relationships between and among generations have been the subject of literature ranging from Shakespeare's dramatic Romeo and Juliet to the humorous musical, Bye Bye Birdie; in both, the older generation essentially frets and muses about the younger-"Why can't they be like we were?"-and those in the younger generation, in turn, wonder why they must conform to the outdated ways of their elders.

As educators, DKG members naturally interact with those in younger generations- as well as with colleagues and community members who may represent still other age groups, each replete with its own experiences and perceptions. Clearly, an understanding of generational issues is thus important for educators and serves as the theme for the first two articles in this issue. Editorial Board member Perry-Sheldon provides an overview of the significance of generational issues in a variety of fields and then reviews two recent books on the topic. …

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