Academic journal article Child Welfare

From the Editor: Where Am I Going to Live?

Academic journal article Child Welfare

From the Editor: Where Am I Going to Live?

Article excerpt

Where am I going to live? How am I going to afford that kindof rent? Who is going to help me? These are all statements made by young people exiting foster care and transitioning to adulthood.

Most young people in the 21st century take a longer time to transition to adulthood than their peers in previous years; many remain at home until age 18-21 or older. When they do relocate, many receive financial assistance for their parents or other family members-making it possible, on an entry-level salary, for them to afford housing.

For youth exiting foster care, without the financial resources of family, the transition can be more complex and further complicated by the difficulties one may experience in finding and maintaining affordable housing. Young people in foster care move from complete dependence on the child welfare system to total independence-in many cases, almost overnight. On the open market in New York City, a studio apartment costs a minimum of $950 per month. How might a young person, with an entry-level salary, afford that?

Former foster youth are at greater risk of experiencing homelessness than their peers, according to researchers. Courtney and colleagues (2010, 2011) found that in three Midwestern states, 36% of the participating former foster youth had experienced an episode of homelessness by age 26. …

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