Academic journal article Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal

Factors Influencing the Behavioral Intention to Use Food Delivery Apps

Academic journal article Social Behavior and Personality: an international journal

Factors Influencing the Behavioral Intention to Use Food Delivery Apps

Article excerpt

As food service industry customers are notoriously fickle, the industry has to keep up with changes in taste, fashion, and ease of access. Technology assists in this process, and with the dramatic growth of wireless communication technology and the high penetration rate of the Internet, food service businesses now rely on technology as a major information resource and marketing tool (Bickerton, 2015). The proliferation of smartphones has exacerbated this trend, as they provide for the real-time connectivity of mobile apps, making food delivery apps popular with busy diners in pursuit of speed and convenience. As food delivery apps have increased in popularity, the competitive dynamics of the food delivery market have increased (S.-W. Jeong, 2016), particularly in Korea, because delivery service is deeply embedded in Korean society (S.-W. Jeong, 2016). Demand for this service exploded from the 1990s onwards, resulting in the market reaching 12 trillion won (US$10.3 billion; Bae, 2015). When food delivery apps appeared in early 2010, their market size was estimated to be 1.7 trillion won (US$1.4 billion), in 2015 and this extended to an estimated 2 trillion won (US$1.7 billion) in 2015 (Bae, 2015).

With accelerated competition in the food service industry and the popularity of food delivery apps, it is useful to have an understanding of the factors that entice consumers to use these apps. Therefore, we used the extended technology acceptance model (TAM) to investigate the determinants that either drive or impede user intention to use food delivery apps. It is indicated in this model that system use will be based on perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness.

Literature Review and Development of Hypotheses

Information

In an environment dominated by the Internet, customers' purchasing decisions may be determined by the perceived quality of information (M. Jeong & Lambert, 2001). Ahn, Ryu, and Han (2004) stated that information quality, system quality, and service quality are variables that directly affect the perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness of a technology. Rese, Schreiber, and Baier (2014) found that, of these, information quality is the primary concern for online customers. They surveyed IKEA's mobile app users and showed that when participants were provided with an augmented reality app, the perceived informative nature of the app influenced its perceived usefulness.

Previous researchers have categorized information that influences consumers into user-generated (Pavlou & Dimoka, 2006) and firm-generated (Cheung, Lee, & Rabjohn, 2008; Dellarocas, Zhang, & Awad, 2007; Z. Liu & Park, 2015) types. When a product is purchased online, asymmetric information possessed by the buyer and seller will eventually lead to the exposure of additional risk to the customer (Pavlou & Dimoka, 2006). This happens when the buyer cannot physically check the product and must, thus, rely on possibly inaccurate or insufficient information provided by the seller (H. G. Lee, 1998). Because of the uncertainty of the quality of a product in an online environment, consumers obtain trust and credibility from consumer reviews (Z. Liu & Park, 2015). This reduces the asymmetry of the information (Cheung et al., 2008). Higher ratings and more reviews of products lead to more sales and encourage the buyer's decision (Dellarocas, Zhang, & Awad, 2007). However, regardless of whether the reviews are positive or negative, consumers perceive them as providing useful information (Purnawirawan, De Pelsmacker, & Dens, 2012). Buyers' negative information is read more carefully than positive information and buyers perceive these posts to be more useful (Ito, Larsen, Smith, & Cacioppo, 1998). Therefore, we proposed the following hypotheses:

Hypothesis 1: User-generated information will have a positive effect on the perceived usefulness of a food delivery app.

Hypothesis 2: Firm-generated information will have a positive effect on the perceived usefulness of a food delivery app. …

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