Academic journal article Library Philosophy and Practice

Technology Acceptance Model in the Domains of LIS and Education: A Review of Selected Literature

Academic journal article Library Philosophy and Practice

Technology Acceptance Model in the Domains of LIS and Education: A Review of Selected Literature

Article excerpt

Introduction

Users' technology acceptance has been a long-lasting issue and a significant stream of research for more than two decades (Chutter, 2009). These studies attempt to examine how to promote technology usage among users as well as to identify factors that hinder the usage and intentions to use the technology (Kripanont, 2007). A considerable number of theories and models engaged in explaining users' technology acceptance have been developed by different researchers. These include the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) (Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975), the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) (Davis, 1989; Davis, Bagozzi & Warshaw 1989), the Theory of Planned Behaviour (Ajzen, 1991), Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) (Bandura, 1986), the Information System (IS) Success Model (DeLone & McLean, 1992), the Innovation Diffusion Theory (Rogers, 1995), TAM 2 (Venkatesh & Davis, 2000), Decomposed Theory of Planned Behaviour (DTPB) (Taylor & Todd, 1995b) and Combined TAM and TPB (Augmented TAM) (Taylor & Todd, 1995a) (Li, 2010; Jeong, 2011).

Among those theoretical frameworks, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) holds a prominent status in Information Systems (IS) research (Kim, 2006; Han, 2003). The Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) is a well established model and is frequently being tested in IS research (Jeong, 2011; Hindagolla & Takashi, 2014). Also, TAM is regarded to be the most influential model with the power to explain and predict users' technology usage behaviour (Hindagolla & Takashi, 2014). Kim (2006) asserts that, the Technology Acceptance Model has been identified as "the most robust, parsimonious, and influential" model among user acceptance theories (p.1716). TAM is simple as well as easy to employ into different research contexts and this model provides a quick and cost-effective way of obtaining information on a user's perceptions towards a technology (Han, 2003)..

This study comprehensively and critically reviews the literature related to TAM, including TAM replications, validations, extensions and TAM related empirical studies, with the main focus on the contexts of 'Education' and 'Library and Information Science (LIS)'. Also, the study attempts to understand different changes done on the model by various researchers. Reviewing TAM related literature will aid to value the current state of knowledge and to recognize the gaps in literature which could be filled by future studies in this area.

Overview of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM)

The TAM is a theoretical extension of the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) which explains the determinants of behaviours performed with conscious intentions (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980; Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975). TRA describes one's behaviour via his or her intention to perform it, which is in turn suggested to be shaped by the individual's attitudes and the person's subjective norms with regard to that behaviour (Ajzen & Fishbein, 1980; Fishbein & Ajzen, 1975). In 1986, Fred D. Davis introduced the TAM in his PhD thesis, as an adaptation of TRA (Davis, 1989). The TAM was specifically designed to explain behaviours with regard to computer usage (Davis et al., 1989).

Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) offers a compelling theoretical foundation for explaining a person's motives of utilizing an information technology or system (Kim, 2006). This model suggests that when a person is introduced to a new information system or new technology, his or her decision on using it will be affected by several factors. The TAM theorizes that two belief variables, Perceived Ease of Use (PEOU) and Perceived Usefulness (PU) are the fundamental determinants of the user's behavioural intention to use a technology (Davis, 1989). Perceived usefulness is defined as "the degree to which a person believes that using a particular system would enhance his or her job performance" (Davis, 1989, p. 320), whereas perceived ease of use is defined as "the degree to which a person believes that using a particular system would be free of effort" (Davis, 1989, p. …

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