Academic journal article English Journal

Soft(a)ware in the English Classroom

Academic journal article English Journal

Soft(a)ware in the English Classroom

Article excerpt

Pedagogy's Patents: Opening the Door on Technology's History in Our Classrooms

To open the door on one's practice, as Paul Thomas discusses in this issue, is to reclaim pedagogical agency where systemic influences deny it. Software-powered technologies (Lynch) have played a significant role in disempowering educators and families when used in the service of neoliberal reform agendas. However, as I have shared in past columns, software-powered technologies are also capable of facilitating inquiry-based collaborative teaching and learning. In what follows, I offer a visual exploration of the history of technology in our classrooms, opening the door on the ever-present interplay between and among schools, businesses, and the federal government. I curate a collection of patents for technologies used in schools dating back over a century.

1870, Slate. Simple elegance, the slate provided a 19th-century ''personalized" way for students to learn. Rather than a single blackboard, each student had his or her own.

1888, School Desk. The legs bolted to the floor and the actual desktop was provided by the person sitting in front of you. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.