Academic journal article Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice

The Psychological Fabric of Ethical Subjectivity in Woody Allen's Films

Academic journal article Contemporary Readings in Law and Social Justice

The Psychological Fabric of Ethical Subjectivity in Woody Allen's Films

Article excerpt

1.Introduction

Over the past decade, there has been mounting evidence outlining the language of notions and representations that assists in organizing Allen's comedy, his observations on the character of human existence, his contrasted approach of filmmaking, and his conveying of cultural identities. These findings emphasize the relevance of inspecting Allen's stirring up of the contrast between illusion and reality, the sense of self-reference that replicates and alters all over his films, his cinematic parodies and patterns, and the relevance of his anecdotes and sketches.

2.Allen's Development of the Cinematic Narrative

Several of Allen's films consecrate themselves to elucidating the human inclination for love. Allen's films accomplish their reasons of distraction. Allen does not situate the issue in the complexities of cinematic interaction. The characters in Manhattan cushion themselves against questions of human ultimacy via their concerns with their amorous complications. (Bailey) Allen's public figure has integrated the conflict between durable art and trivial enjoyment. Allen praises the connection of art cinema and Europe and associates American cinema with show business. The opposition art/entertainment is a pivotal trope in Allen's films. Allen mingles brief remarks on prevailing affairs with never-ending metaphysical problems. Allen's cyclical themes, stylistic analogies, and self-reflexivity position him in the sphere of auteur cinema. The summoning of Allen's trustworthy role takes into account a relevance that remains in conflict with the established view of the auteur (Allen's films become newsworthy via his observations on current affairs). The thematic quality arises from the fact that Allen's scripts and screen performances have been impacted by his practice as a stand-up comedian. Allen transfers to his films the satire, oddity, and perspectives he performs on the settings of variety theaters and television. The allusions to relevant subjects construe the characters enacted by Allen as observers conveying their opinions through jokes. The stand-up approach enables the permeation of the film by the extrafilmic. The antagonism low/high art provides comic ingredients for couple mobility in Allen's narratives, representing his personal signature aesthetically. In Stardust the admission to the artist's purposes corresponds to the one to his private life. The blurring between real life and illusion (Androniceanu and Ohanyan, 2016; Carr et al., 2015; Jacquette, 2015; Nica et al., 2016a, b; Popescu, 2016a, b, c; Siegesmund, 2016) develops as the relentless intrusion of the public into the private realm. Stardust modifies the underlying forces between artist and spectators by having the audience place trust in the auteur. (Sayad) Allen inclines to recreate himself, incessantly defying audience requirements, and appeals to a consonant sense of familiarity with the spectators as a result of his genuine oddity that may be illustrated by his nonexistence of star-like attributes. The decline between Allen's onscreen and offscreen character may justify much of his ascendancy. Allen's inadequacies as a comedian have brought about a staggering homogeneity in relation to the characters he enacts. Allen performs essentially the same role even in films different in theme and style. Allen constitutes an unconventional situation of a star figure that harmonizes several incompatible identities. Allen's films generally handle the meaning of famous person and the confusion between the public representation and private individual. Deconstructing Harry brings the question of the vagueness between the real/offscreen Allen and the fictional/onscreen Allen into well-defined point of convergence, resulting in issues regarding the undetermined boundary between Allen's activity and his art. (Glenn)

Allen claims that television is an ordinary device and not an art form, ridiculing television patterns in his films. …

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