Academic journal article Journal of the Association for Information Systems

Understanding User Adaptation toward a New IT System in Organizations: A Social Network Perspective

Academic journal article Journal of the Association for Information Systems

Understanding User Adaptation toward a New IT System in Organizations: A Social Network Perspective

Article excerpt

1 Introduction

Enterprise-wide IT system implementation constitutes a huge financial undertaking for businesses and a thoroughly disruptive event to employees. Oftentimes, despite intensive project management and careful planning, implementation may go awry and incur huge financial losses (Sykes, 2015). According to Panorama Consulting Solutions 2015 (Panaroma Consulting Solutions, 2015), despite a US$1.7 million increase in average implementation cost, 60 percent of ERP implementations failed to realize material business benefits. Among the myriad challenges, research has identified user adaptation as a key impediment to successful IT implementation. Given its substantial implications on the profitability and sustainability of businesses, organizations should develop an improved understanding of user adaptation to IT system implementation (Maruping & Magni, 2015).

Previous research on IT system usage has primarily focused on technology-related cognitive processing (e.g., perceived ease of use and perceived usefulness) and situational factors (e.g., gender and voluntariness) and found them to be particularly important in determining users' initial adoption of technology (e.g., Venkatesh, Davis, & Morris, 2007; Venkatesh, Morris, Davis, & Davis, 2003). Increasing evidence suggests that understanding technology usage beyond initial adoption is important if not critical. In particular, extant studies suggest that an IT system's actual value can only be realized through post-adoption IT use, which is necessary for technologies to be fully integrated into actual work processes (e.g., Ahuja & Thatcher, 2005; Hsieh, Rai, & Xu, 2011; Maruping & Magni, 2015). Although these technology-related cognitive processing and situational factors are the key determinants of users' initial technology adoption (Sykes, Venkatesh, & Gosain, 2009), these factors may not be entirely relevant in explaining post-adoption IT use, which usually involves significant IT-induced changes (e.g., redesign of business processes and deployment of new system functions (Morris & Venkatesh, 2010)). Accordingly, in this paper, we first enhance existing understanding of technology adoption by developing new insights into post-adoption IT use.

Research broadly categorizes the post-adoption stage as one of the most challenging stages after a new IT system implementation (Markus & Tanis, 2000). In this stage, users usually demonstrate strong resistance to IT-induced changes and, at times, attempt to avoid the system altogether to cope with the strain that the changes produce (Sykes, Venkatesh, & Johnson, 2014). Ample IS research has focused on understanding the effectiveness of managerial interventions (e.g., user training, help desk support, and change management support) for technology usage in businesses (Sykes, 2015). Although these managerial interventions can be instrumental in nurturing initial user adoption, they may not be entirely effective in determining users' post-adoption IT use. For instance, although research has recognized formal user training as the key mechanism to help users adopt new technologies, it has largely ignored the importance of informal mechanisms (e.g., on-the-job training and social learning) in sustaining post-adoption IT use (Robey, Ross, & Boudreau, 2002). Further, extensive user training may not be economically feasible in practice (Venkatesh, Zhang, & Sykes, 2011).

Indeed, emerging evidence suggests that social networks (i.e., on which individuals develop relationships to exchange information among their peers to accomplish work-related tasks (Reagans & McEvily, 2003)) can be a vital mechanism in motivating productive post-adoption IT use (Sasidharan, Santhanam, Brass, & Sambamurthy, 2012). More importantly, the IS literature has investigated social networks by, for example, examining advice-seeking networks' effect on technology usage and advice-giving networks' effect on continued usage (Magni, Angst, & Agarwal, 2012; Sykes et al. …

Search by... Author
Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

Oops!

An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.